Kisa Boutique

trust your wanderlust

Salad dressing recipe...and the secret ingredient is???

foodemily kisa6 Comments

So do you think it looks yummy?

Well what is in there?

3 large potatoes steamed and cooled 1 cob of corn, cut from cob, steamed and cooled 1 large tomato 2 small cucumbers 1 small white onion 1 large handful of chopped flat leaf parsley

chop it all up to your liking, fine chunks or hunks...

And the dressing...(approximately- I eye ball and taste) 2 heaping tablespoons extra virgin GOOD olive oil (very, very spoiled by that here on the Aegean coast) 3 heaping tablespoons apple cider vinegar dash of salt to taste

plus the, drum roll please, secret ingredient...

1 heaping tablespoon sumac flakes

No need to emulsify the oil blah, blah, blah just pour the ingredients right over whatever your salad of choice is for that meal.

Mix well and let it sit as the flavors meld. Dash of pepper could do you good too.

I use this dressing often be it simple green salads or a whatever is in the fridge salad. (My sister is the granola bar rockstar but my mom is the whatever is in the fridge SALAD rockstar!!!)

So my secret sumac ingredient, (sumak in turkish) is no secret at all of course. It has been used for centuries or more. But was very new to me and I believe is for most Americans.

I learned it from the old chef at our cafe...and it's bomb! He was from Adana in the south east of Turkey. This spice is commonly used there, getting closer to the middle east, as a compliment with kebabs, mmm...mmm...spicy Adana kebaps with a side of an onion, parsley and sumac salad! yes please!

These photos are from a lovely lunch with my hubby yesterday. Despite the heat we sat on the balcony...it was nice our baby girl was napping...we could eat slowly and chat. He doesn't mind me taking pictures during our meal...very supportive:)

The salad is nice but did you notice the fried cheese...yeah that's right...fried cheese...

Hellim in Turkish...is a hard, salty(some brands/village varieties need to be rinsed because sooo salty) cheese sliced lengthwise and fried! Turning it into this gooey textured goodness...yum and yum...

Lots of bread is a must, no excuse in a Turkish meal. My sister-in-law wonders how people get full in America if you don't eat bread with every meal? Do they just go about hungry?

Anyways the bread is always fresh and crusty and serves as a utensil almost, a catalyst really for dipped delights. In this case olive oil from the olive bowl which is always full, ready in the fridge! (There's my cute hubby reflected on the spoon)

In my Midwestern town we were mainly exposed to black olives that were factory pitted in a can and about the only good thing about them is that it was fun to eat them off the tips of your fingers(You know what I mean right?). Maybe throw some green ones with reds pimentos around too, slice them on your pizza...I guess...

Basically I never really liked olives...

Then I came to Turkey and lived on the Aegean coast...

There are huge (CRAZY ones my husband bought off the side of the road, you can hunt them out like that everywhere here!), big and little, black and green, and pink, and brown and yum and yum...and you can taste them ALL before you buy them (another whole post evolving here)...

But after all that goodness...

This is why I stay...it's those eyes that won me over even without words...

Well I spilled many secrets today...AFIYET OLSUN!